Texas Breast Center Releases Article on The Financial Cost of Breast Cancer

Texas Breast Center in Waxahachie released an article discussing the cost of breast cancer treatment to patients. In the article, The Cost of Breast Cancer Treatment: What are the Contributing Factors? Dr. Valerie Gorman discusses various components that can affect the overall financial burden breast cancer can be.

One of these factors is the kind of treatment, such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination. Another factor is the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis. For example, “for those with stage 0 cancer, the average cost of treatment at twelve months after diagnosis was $60, 637…[while] at stage IV, the most difficult to treat, the average treatment costs were $134,682 at twelve months.”

Breast Cancer Financial Costs

Health insurance is another factor discussed. Having health insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid can affect the cost of medications, treatments, and even appointments.

Researchers in North Carolina found that patients who received a cancer diagnosis and did not have insurance or Medicare paid $6,711 for medication, while those with insurance paid $3,616 and those with Medicare paid $3,090 simply because they do not have the means to negotiate for a lower price.

All of these factors come together to cause an average cost of $85,772 per patient within their first year after being diagnosed with breast cancer. The number jumps to $103,735 after the second year. While breast cancer is not something anyone wants, it is something to be prepared for, at least financially, if possible. And your medical team is willing to work with you to meet your needs.

Dr. Valerie J. Gorman, MD, FACS, offers a personalized approach to breast cancer treatment, taking into account all the factors that will affect the cost and your ultimate recovery. She serves as the Chief of Surgery and Medical Director of Surgical Services at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center, and she is board certified by the American Board of Surgery.


Texas Breast Center’s Article on Seroma & Fluid Collection After Breast Cancer

Valerie Gorman, MD, FACS has just released an article on seromas, a potential side effect of breast cancer surgery. Dr. Gorman published the article to inform patients about the possible risks and lack thereof that accompany seroma.

Seroma, a collection of fluid where removed tissues once were, is a common side effect and can be harmless. In most cases, a seroma will take care of itself, as the body will reabsorb the fluids.

Seroma Breast Cancer Surgery Texas Side Effects

Doctor Gorman discusses treatment for the more stubborn seromas, which can require:

insert[ing] a needle into the seroma and then drain[ing] the excess fluid out of it. In some cases, this procedure may need to be repeated on more than two or three occasions. If the fluid continues to return even after numerous drainings, then some doctors may decide that a minor operation to remove the seroma entirely might be the best option, or to place a drain temporarily.

Some potential risk factors for seromas are age, breast size, previous biopsy surgery, use of certain medications, and history of seromas, though Dr. Gorman states that none of these factors ensure a seroma.

Dr. Valerie J. Gorman is a breast surgeon who specializes in surgical oncology and other surgical diseases–specifically of the breast–and is certified by the American Board of Surgery. She serves at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in Waxahachie as Chief of Surgery and Medical Director of Surgical Services.


Hidden Scar Breast Cancer Surgery Improves Surgical Technique & Cosmetic Results

Valerie Gorman, MD, FACS has just released an article on the Hidden Scar technique with breast cancer surgery. Dr. Gorman released the article because patients are growingly concerned about their appearance after breast cancer surgery.

Hidden Scar Breast Cancer Surgery

Dr. Gorman and her team are trained in the Hidden Scar technique of Breast Cancer surgery to help patients by improving recovery time, reducing the surgical site, and increasing patient self-confidence.

By reducing the surgical site and reaching the cancerous cells by an out of the way route, scars can be kept small and tucked out of sight. Dr. Gorman explains that, using this method, scars can be hidden in areas like:

  • The Axilla, or under the armpit. The scar is usually hidden in a natural fold.
  • Around the edges of the areola. Many patients prefer this option, as the scaring is minimal and hidden even when wearing a petite bikini top.
  • The Inframammary fold – like the mastectomy.

With the logic of ‘out of sight, out of mind’, a patient can forget about not only the scars but the disease itself, especially now that the tumor has been removed. There are no traumatic scars continually acting as a reminder. The patient can move forward.

Dr. Valerie J. Gorman is a breast surgeon who specializes in surgical diseases of the breast–specifically surgical oncology–and is certified by the American Board of Surgery. She serves as Chief of Surgery and Medical Director of Surgical Services at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Waxahachie.